Posts Tagged sambal oelek

Grilled Tequila-Citrus Shrimp

SONY DSCMarinating shrimp before cooking it on the grill results in a wonderfully tasty experience. It makes the time-consuming and tedious job of cleaning and de-veining them, one of my least favorite cooking tasks, so much more worthwhile.

This recipe calls for large (or jumbo) shrimp, and you should marinate for at least four hours before firing up the grill. After that, it doesn’t take long before you’re enjoying the fruits of your labor. You just have to grill the shrimp until they turn pink!

 

Ingredients

1 lb large or jumbo shrimp, peeled and deveined

4 tbsp gold tequila

4 tbsp fresh lime juice

2 tbsp fresh lemon juice

1/4 cup olive oil

1 tbsp lemon pepper

2 tbsp fresh minced garlic

2 tsp Sambal Oelek or red pepper flakes (optional)

Pinch of Kosher salt

Directions

Whisk all ingredients together and place in a resealable plastic bag with the cleaned shrimp. Marinate for at least four hours. Soak about 6 wooden skewers in water for at least 30 minutes before grilling.

Thread about 6 shrimp onto each skewer. Grill on both sides until shrimp are pink and slightly charred.

 

 

 

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Asian Flavored Hot Wings

sriracha-hot-wingsI love a lot of different kinds of food from different countries, but I’m no food snob. I don’t mind telling you that burgers and wings are two of my favorites. You don’t have to wait for the Super Bowl to enjoy wings. They’re great any time. In fact, it’s snowing out right now and I’m making these wings tonight.

This recipe is good for a dozen wings. Feel free to double or triple it for larger quantities of wings. I’m not going to tell you to marinate these wings for an hour or so. The idea here is to marinate overnight if possible…at the minimum six hours. The longer, the better.

Ingredients

12 chicken wings, trimmed and cut

4 cloves of garlic, minced

3 tbsp dark soy sauce

4 tbsp fresh lime juice

Zest of one whole lime

2 tbsp chopped fresh ginger (I often use the fresh ginger in the jar or the paste)

1 tbsp of honey

2-3 tbsp Sambal Oelek or Sriracha Chili Sauce (depending upon the heat level you want)

1 tbsp sesame oil

Chopped chives

Directions

Wash the wing sections and pat dry.

Whisk all of the ingredients together with the exception of the chopped chives, and place the marinade in a plastic bag or bowl with the wings. Be sure that they are evenly coated. Marinate in the refrigerator overnight or, at the very least, for six hours. It’s a good idea to rearrange the wings a few times during the marinating process to ensure that they are marinating evenly.

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees. Place the wings and the marinade in a foil-lined pan and bake for 15 minutes. Turn the oven to “broil” and brown for an additional 10-12 minutes.

Place on a serving tray and top with chopped chives. Serve hot with lime wedges.

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Good Karma’s Absurdly Delicious Slow-Cooked Beef Brisket

For this recipe, you need about a 4 lb. beef brisket (and you cannot substitute corned beef brisket either). Visit your local butcher or call your supermarket (which is what I do) to order yours in advance if brisket is not readily available. The key to this dish is slow cooking.

It also calls for two cups of dark, brewed coffee. Forget Dunkin’ Donuts and forget supermarket brand coffees. For this recipe, you need Starbucks Gold Coast, Italian Roast or Sumatra. Nothing else will do.

Ingredients

1 4-lb. beef brisket

1 large Vidalia onion (coarsely cut)

8 cloves of garlic (cut into fourths)

2 tablespoons of chili powder

2 tablespoons of cumin

2 tablespoons of coriander

2 tablespoons of freshly ground black pepper

2 teaspoons of sea salt

3 tbsp. olive oil

2 tbsp. sambal oelek

2 bottles of Magic Hat No. 8 Beer

2 cups of malt or apple cider vinegar

2 cups of dark coffee

1 can of tomato puree

1 can of chopped tomatoes

Directions

A pasta pan is the right attitude for this dish. Place the olive oil, a handful of the onions and several hunks of garlic in the pan to get the process going. While things are heating up, make a rub with 1 tbsp. each of the cumin, coriander, chili powder, black pepper, and 1 tsp. of the salt. Rub each side of the brisket with a bit of olive oil and spread the rub over both sides.

Once the oil is fairly hot and you can smell the onions and garlic, place the brisket in the pan and brown nicely on both sides. Everything gets easier from here. Remove the brisket and add the beer, vinegar, brewed coffee, tomato puree and chopped tomatoes. Then add the balance of the spices (coriander, cumin, chili powder, salt and pepper). Add the 2 tbsp. of sambal oelek, as well as the rest of the garlic and onions. Stir.

Place the brisket back in the liquid and allow it to come to a boil, then turn to low and allow it to cook for a minimum of six hours. It is important that you taste what you are cooking the brisket in and adjust the spices to your liking. There is no right and wrong here. Personally, I love garlic. Prior to browning my brisket, I actually poke holes in it and place additional cloves of garlic in the holes. It all depends upon what you like.

When done, it’s quite possible that the meat will be hard to cut. It may just fall apart. This is a good thing.

Drain the fat and oil off the remaining liquid and cook down to make a sauce. You can also add a tablespoon of cornstarch mixed with water to hasten the process. It’s great to serve this dish with yellow rice, placing the beef on top and covering the entire thing with the sauce.

Even people who claim to “hate” beef will devour this dish.

 

 

 

 

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