Posts Tagged beef

South-of-the-Border Shredded Beef

Mexican shredded-beefThis is an easy yet incredibly flavorful recipe. It’s ideal for Tacos, Mexican pizza, or Enchiladas. The key to this dish is the use of a slow cooker, and a combination of the right spices. If you don’t want to use taco shells or flour tortillas, you can simply serve this beef on shredded lettuce, with accompaniments like sour cream, guacamole, salsa, and Queso Blanco on the side.

The best cut of beef for this recipe is a chuck roast, about 2.5 to 3 lbs. It’s best to cut it into 3 or 4 pieces before embarking on your flavorful journey, and trimming off any large pieces of fat that may be present.

Ingredients

2.5 to 3 lb chuck roast

2 tbsp olive oil

14 oz beef broth

1 yellow onion, chopped

1 tbsp dried cilantro

1/4 tsp cayenne pepper

2 Jalapeno peppers, seeded and chopped

2 tbsp chili powder

1 tbsp cumin

2 tsp coriander

3 oz tomato paste

1 tbsp garlic powder

1/2 tsp black pepper

1/4 tsp Kosher salt

Directions

Cut the chuck roast into four pieces, trimming any large pieces of fat off the meat. This will help the spices reach every area of the meat. Season with salt and pepper, and sear the meat in a skillet on high until all surfaces of the beef are browned.

Place the beef broth, tomato paste, onion, Jalapeno pepper, and the spices in the crock pot and give it a stir. Submerge the meat in the liquid.

Set the slow cooker to high and cook for four hours, then lower the temperature to “low” and cook for an additional hour or so. It’s important that at least 2-3 inches of liquid is in the crock pot throughout the cooking process. This should not be a problem with a slow cooker.

Remove the beef from the slow cooker and shred it using two forks. By now the slow cooker should automatically move to the “warm” setting. Return the beef to the liquid until ready for use.

Remove with tongs and place it on your serving tray. All I can say is “Yum!”

 

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Korean Braised Short Ribs

Beef Short RibsThis is a tremendously flavorful falling-off-the-bone dish. This recipe was contributed by my partner-in-crime, the charming Bill McKenzie, who is teaming up with me so we can take this blog to the next level.

For this recipe you’ll need a Dutch oven because this masterpiece starts on the stove top and finishes up in the oven.

Ingredients

1.5 lbs beef short ribs

1 cup soy sauce

1/2 cup Sake

1/4 cup Mirin

1/4 cup sesame oil

1 tbsp ginger paste (or minced fresh ginger)

1/4 cup sesame seeds

1 tsp sea salt

2 tsp red pepper flakes

2 tsp coarse ground black pepper

4 scallions, greens and white separated and cut into 1/4 inch pieces

12 cloves garlic

2 cups low-sodium beef stock

Canola oil

Directions

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Drizzle canola oil on the bottom of the Dutch oven. Sprinkle the beef short ribs with sea salt, black pepper and red pepper flakes. Brown the ribs in the Dutch oven on the top of the stove.

Once browned, add the rest of the ingredients, with the exception of the scallion greens and sesame seeds. Cover the Dutch oven and bring everything to a boil, then transfer to the oven. Bake for 1.5 to 2 hours.

Place in a serving dish over white rice. Sprinkle sesame seeds and scallion greens on top.

 

 

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Marinated and Grilled Flank Steak

grilled-marinated-flank-steak-recipeBeef is one of the foods I love, but I don’t have the opportunity to eat it very much. And frankly, that’s a good thing. Nothing beats a good flank steak, but it has to be done right. Flank steak is considered a “lean” cut of beef (very little marble) and, if not cooked properly, it can be tough. Marinating the meat overnight is also recommended as it helps to tenderize the meat. Make no bones about it, this is a “quick” cook. The inside should be red. It should also be sliced very thin against the grain when you’re ready to serve it.

There are two recipes here. They are distinguished the Ingredients (no. 1 and no. 2). The cooking process is the same.

Ingredients, No. 1

2 lb Flank steak

1/3 cup olive oil

2 tbsp balsamic vinegar

4 cloves minced garlic

1/3 cup low-sodium soy sauce or Tamari

1/4 cup honey

1/2 cup chopped fresh cilantro or 2 tbsp cilantro paste (in the tube)

Salt and freshly ground black pepper

Ingredients, No. 2

2 lb Flank steak

1/2 cup dry Sherry

1/2 cup low-sodium soy sauce or Tamari

2 tbsp minced garlic

2 tbsp dark brown sugar

1 tbsp tomato paste

1 tbsp fresh-ground rainbow (white, red, black) pepper

1 tbsp paprika

1 tbsp onion powder

1 tbsp dried oregano

1 tbsp dried thyme

2 tbsp lemon juice

1 tsp cayenne pepper

Salt and freshly ground black pepper

Directions

Make 1/4-inch slices in the flank steak about an inch apart. Whisk all ingredients together. Place the steak and the marinating ingredients in a gallon freezer bag, and marinate overnight.

Lightly spray your grill with grill oil spray (or lightly coat your cast-iron grill pan). Fire it up until it’s hot. Before you grill the flank steak, apply salt and freshly ground black pepper (to taste). Grill the flank steak on each side for about 6 minutes. Remove from the heat and cover lightly with aluminum foil. Let it rest for about 5 minutes before slicing. When you slice the flank steak, slice thinly across the grain.

 

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Pan-Seared Spicy Rib-Eye Steak

rib eye steakI’ll be honest with you, I don’t eat much beef. But it’s not because I don’t want to. My partner doesn’t like the texture of beef. And she definitely doesn’t like the whole “rare” thing. This is good, though, because moderation is important when eating red meat. You have to remember that pork and lamb are also considered red meats when planning your menu for the week. So, when I make this dish, I am really in the mood for it and I enjoy it thoroughly. For those who are purists and do not like the spicy aspect of this dish, I provide an alternative.

This can also be made using sirloin strip steak, but I find rib-eye more tender, so it’s my beef cut of choice. You can use either bone-in or boneless. If you want to make a pretty presentation and cut and fan the steak on a plate, use boneless. Either way, it’s absolutely delicious.

Here’s some fair warning: This recipe creates smoke which could very well set off your smoke detectors. I made it this past Friday night and did just that, even with the windows open. The dog didn’t much like the sound but, for we humans, it’s a small price to pay for such a delicious dish.

Also, the level of “marble” in the beef is important. The more “marble” the more tender after it’s cooked.

Spicy Rub

1 tbsp paprika

1 tbsp chili powder

1 tbsp garlic powder

1 tbsp Kosher or Sea salt

1 tbsp coarse ground black pepper

1 tbsp red pepper flakes (if you don’t like heat; just leave this out)

This is a simple process. Just mix all of these ingredients together. If there is any left over after you’ve rubbed it on the steak, just store it in an airtight container.

Ingredients

2 rib-eye steaks, about 1-1/2 inches thick

Spicy Steak Rub (above)

Canola oil (to coat the steak)

Directions

Remove the steak from the refrigerator and bring it to room temperature. Place a 12-inch cast iron skilled (or other oven-proof skillet) in the over and heat the oven to 500 degrees (hence, the smoke folks).

When the oven reaches 500 degrees, remove the skillet from the oven and place it on your stove-top range on high. Coat the steak lightly with the Canola oil and coat both sides with the spicy rub.

Place the steaks in the skillet and cook for 30 seconds. Use tongs to flip the steak and cook for another 30 seconds. Then, put the pan straight into the 500-degree oven for 2 minutes. After 2 minutes, flip the steaks and cook for another 2 minutes. The steak is being cooked for “rare.” If you prefer medium rare, add 1 to 1-1/2 minutes on each side.

Remove the steak from the oven and cover with aluminum foil and allow it to sit for about 2 minutes. (While you’re waiting, wave your arms like crazy under your smoke detectors to get them to shut up.)

You can either serve the steak whole or slice thin and fan onto your plate (if you’re into presentation, of course).

Alternative to Spicy Rub

If you’re not into the whole spicy thing (which I do not understand, of course), simply sprinkle both sides of the steak before cooking with Kosher or Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper. If this is the way you go, I suggest serving it with a bottle of Tabasco sauce or a dipping sauce. Here’s a good one:

Dipping Sauce

2 tbsp reduced-sodium soy sauce

2 tbsp fresh lime juice

1 tbsp Sriracha

1 tsp malt vinegar

Knock yourself out.

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Good Karma’s Absurdly Delicious Slow-Cooked Beef Brisket

For this recipe, you need about a 4 lb. beef brisket (and you cannot substitute corned beef brisket either). Visit your local butcher or call your supermarket (which is what I do) to order yours in advance if brisket is not readily available. The key to this dish is slow cooking.

It also calls for two cups of dark, brewed coffee. Forget Dunkin’ Donuts and forget supermarket brand coffees. For this recipe, you need Starbucks Gold Coast, Italian Roast or Sumatra. Nothing else will do.

Ingredients

1 4-lb. beef brisket

1 large Vidalia onion (coarsely cut)

8 cloves of garlic (cut into fourths)

2 tablespoons of chili powder

2 tablespoons of cumin

2 tablespoons of coriander

2 tablespoons of freshly ground black pepper

2 teaspoons of sea salt

3 tbsp. olive oil

2 tbsp. sambal oelek

2 bottles of Magic Hat No. 8 Beer

2 cups of malt or apple cider vinegar

2 cups of dark coffee

1 can of tomato puree

1 can of chopped tomatoes

Directions

A pasta pan is the right attitude for this dish. Place the olive oil, a handful of the onions and several hunks of garlic in the pan to get the process going. While things are heating up, make a rub with 1 tbsp. each of the cumin, coriander, chili powder, black pepper, and 1 tsp. of the salt. Rub each side of the brisket with a bit of olive oil and spread the rub over both sides.

Once the oil is fairly hot and you can smell the onions and garlic, place the brisket in the pan and brown nicely on both sides. Everything gets easier from here. Remove the brisket and add the beer, vinegar, brewed coffee, tomato puree and chopped tomatoes. Then add the balance of the spices (coriander, cumin, chili powder, salt and pepper). Add the 2 tbsp. of sambal oelek, as well as the rest of the garlic and onions. Stir.

Place the brisket back in the liquid and allow it to come to a boil, then turn to low and allow it to cook for a minimum of six hours. It is important that you taste what you are cooking the brisket in and adjust the spices to your liking. There is no right and wrong here. Personally, I love garlic. Prior to browning my brisket, I actually poke holes in it and place additional cloves of garlic in the holes. It all depends upon what you like.

When done, it’s quite possible that the meat will be hard to cut. It may just fall apart. This is a good thing.

Drain the fat and oil off the remaining liquid and cook down to make a sauce. You can also add a tablespoon of cornstarch mixed with water to hasten the process. It’s great to serve this dish with yellow rice, placing the beef on top and covering the entire thing with the sauce.

Even people who claim to “hate” beef will devour this dish.

 

 

 

 

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